CPD NEWS
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PROTECT YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION FROM SCAMMERS
Scam artists use clever schemes to defraud millions of people every year, threatening financial security and generating substantial profits for criminal organizations and common crooks. They use phone, email, postal mail, and
the Internet to cross geographic boundaries and trick victims into sending money and giving out personal information. While scammers can be clever, many can be foiled by knowledgeable consumers.

Clinton Police Dept Detective Sgt Bob Suarez recently assisted The U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security in busting an East Tennessee trio in an alleged document scam. Two brothers have been indicted and a third man charged in a fraud conspiracy case in which authorities allege the Social Security numbers of U.S. citizens were stolen and used to craft fake documents for illegal immigrants seeking jobs. Federal agents said an exact figure is not listed, but documents suggest the ring netted tens of thousands of dollars.

Here are some things you can do to help protect yourself from identuty theft:

Donít respond to messages that ask for your personal or financial information, whether the message come as an email, a phone call, a text message, or an ad.
Donít click on links in a message, or call phone numbers that are left on your answering machine, either. The crooks behind these messages are trying to trick you into giving up your personal information. If you get a message and are concerned about your account status, call the number on your credit or debit card or your statement and check it out.

Keep in mind that wiring money is like sending cash: once itís gone, you canít get it back. Con artists often insist that people wire money, especially overseas, because itís nearly impossible to reverse the transaction or trace the money. Donít wire money to strangers, to sellers who insist on wire transfers for payment, or to someone who claims to be a relative in an emergency (and wants to keep the request a secret).

Donít send money to someone you donít know. That includes an online merchant youíve never heard of. Itís best to do business with sites you know and trust.

Donít agree to deposit a check from someone you donít know and then wire money back, no matter how convincing the story. By law, banks must make funds from deposited checks available within days, but uncovering a fake check can take weeks. You are responsible for the checks you deposit: When a check turns out to be a fake, itís you who is responsible for paying back the bank.

Read your bills and monthly statements regularly - on paper and online. Scammers steal account information and then run up charges or commit crimes in
your name.

Remember thereís no such thing as a sure thing. If someone contacts you promoting low-risk, high-return investment opportunities, stay away. When you hear pitches that insist you act now, guarantees of big profits, promises of little or no financial risk, or demands that you send cash immediately, report them to the local police.
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PROTECT YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION FROM SCAMMERS
Scam artists use clever schemes to defraud millions of people every year, threatening financial security and generating substantial profits for criminal organizations and common crooks. They use phone, email, postal mail, and the Internet to cross geographic boundaries and trick victims into sending money and giving out personal information. While scammers can be clever, many can be foiled by knowledgeable consumers.

Clinton Police Dept Detective Sgt Bob Suarez recently assisted The U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security in busting an East Tennessee trio in an alleged document scam. Two brothers have been indicted and a third man charged in a fraud conspiracy case in which authorities allege the Social Security numbers of U.S. citizens were stolen and used to craft fake documents for illegal immigrants seeking jobs. Federal agents said an exact figure is not listed, but documents suggest the ring netted tens of thousands of dollars.
Here are some things you can do to help protect yourself from identuty theft:

Donít respond to messages that ask for your personal or financial information, whether the message come as an email, a phone call, a text message, or an ad.

Donít click on links in a message, or call phone numbers that are left on your answering machine, either. The crooks behind these messages are trying to trick you into giving up your personal information. If you get a message and are concerned about your account status, call the number on your credit or debit card or your statement and check it out.

Keep in mind that wiring money is like sending cash: once itís gone, you canít get it back. Con artists often insist that people wire money, especially overseas, because itís nearly impossible to reverse the transaction or trace the money. Donít wire money to strangers, to sellers who insist on wire transfers for payment, or to someone who claims to be a relative in an emergency (and wants to keep the request a secret).

Donít send money to someone you donít know. That includes an online merchant youíve never heard of. Itís best to do business with sites you know and trust.

Donít agree to deposit a check from someone you donít know and then wire money back, no matter how convincing the story. By law, banks must make funds from deposited checks available within days, but uncovering a fake check can take weeks. You are responsible for the checks you deposit: When a check turns out to be a fake, itís you who is responsible for paying back the bank.

Read your bills and monthly statements regularly - on paper and online. Scammers steal account information and then run up charges or commit crimes in
your name.

Remember thereís no such thing as a sure thing. If someone contacts you promoting low-risk, high-return investment opportunities, stay away. When you hear pitches that insist you act now, guarantees of big profits, promises of little or no financial risk, or demands that you send cash immediately, report them to the local police.
PROTECT YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION FROM SCAMMERS
Scam artists use clever schemes to defraud millions of people every year, threatening financial security and generating substantial profits for criminal organizations and common crooks. They use phone, email, postal mail, and the Internet to cross geographic boundaries and trick victims into sending money and giving out personal information. While scammers can be clever, many can be foiled by knowledgeable consumers.

Clinton Police Dept Detective Sgt Bob Suarez recently assisted The U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security in busting an East Tennessee trio in an alleged document scam. Two brothers have been indicted and a third man charged in a fraud conspiracy case in which authorities allege the Social Security numbers of U.S. citizens were stolen and used to craft fake documents for illegal immigrants seeking jobs. Federal agents said an exact figure is not listed, but documents suggest the ring netted tens of thousands of dollars.

Here are some things you can do to help protect yourself from identuty theft:

Donít respond to messages that ask for your personal or financial information, whether the message come as an email, a phone call, a text message, or an ad.

Donít click on links in a message, or call phone numbers that are left on your answering machine, either. The crooks behind these messages are trying to trick you into giving up your personal information. If you get a message and are concerned about your account status, call the number on your credit or debit card or your statement and check it out.

Keep in mind that wiring money is like sending cash: once itís gone, you canít get it back. Con artists often insist that people wire money, especially overseas, because itís nearly impossible to reverse the transaction or trace the money. Donít wire money to strangers, to sellers who insist on wire transfers for payment, or to someone who claims to be a relative in an emergency (and wants to keep the request a secret).

Donít send money to someone you donít know. That includes an online merchant youíve never heard of. Itís best to do business with sites you know and trust.

Donít agree to deposit a check from someone you donít know and then wire money back, no matter how convincing the story. By law, banks must make funds from deposited checks available within days, but uncovering a fake check can take weeks. You are responsible for the checks you deposit: When a check turns out to be a fake, itís you who is responsible for paying back the bank.

Read your bills and monthly statements regularly - on paper and online. Scammers steal account information and then run up charges or commit crimes in
your name.

Remember thereís no such thing as a sure thing. If someone contacts you promoting low-risk, high-return investment opportunities, stay away. When you hear pitches that insist you act now, guarantees of big profits, promises of little or no financial risk, or demands that you send cash immediately, report them to the local police.
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